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Giant Singapore to absorb 1% GST increase on 700 essential products from January to June 2024

Singapore’s Giant supermarket chain announced that it will absorb the Goods and Services Tax (GST) increase scheduled to take effect on Jan 1, 2024.

The initiative will cover 700 essential products and is set to last for the first six months of the upcoming year.

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SINGAPORE: Supermarket chain Giant has announced that it will absorb the Goods and Services Tax (GST) increase scheduled to take effect on Jan 1, 2024.

The initiative will cover 700 essential products and is set to last for the initial six months of the upcoming year.

The decision to absorb the one percentage point GST increase was confirmed by the parent company, DFI Retail Group, on Tuesday (26 Dec).

The move aims to ensure the continued affordability of essential products and to allay the growing concerns many Singaporeans have about the cost of living.

From January to June 2024, the supermarket chain will extend this relief across various key categories, including fresh produce, personal care items, and household essentials.

The 700 discounted products have been carefully selected based on customer feedback and data analysis to ensure maximum value for Giant customers, DFI Retail Group said, emphasizing its commitment to helping Singaporeans mitigate the effects of inflation and the overall rising cost of living.

The company’s Singapore managing director for food, Yoep Man, said, “Our top priority is to ensure that essential products remain affordable. By absorbing the GST increase over six months, we hope that Singaporeans can continue to shop and enjoy their favourite essential products in the new year.”

In addition to absorbing the GST increase, Giant will also introduce a 4 % storewide discount every Tuesday specifically for senior citizens.

This discount initiative is aimed at further assisting the elderly community throughout 2024.

This helps to address the rising concerns about the cost of living among seniors and to ensure that their “favourite” essential products remain affordable, DFI Retail Group said.

Giant also announced that it would continue its Lower Prices That Last campaign that was launched in 2020.

Shoppers can access these savings by signing up for the Yuu Rewards Club, earning points for every dollar spent.

These accumulated points can be exchanged for rewards at over 1,000 locations, including Giant, Cold Storage supermarkets, CS Fresh supermarkets, Guardian pharmacies, and 7-Eleven convenience stores.

Other retail giants, such as FairPrice Group and Sheng Siong supermarket chains have also announced their intention to absorb the increase for specific products for a period ranging from three to six months in 2024.

Ikea, a major furniture retailer, stated on 21 Dec that it would keep both its in-store and online prices unchanged to guarantee the affordability of its home furnishing products for people in Singapore, addressing concerns about the increasing cost of living too.

The GST rate is set to rise from 8% to 9% on Jan 1, 2024, marking the second phase of a two-stage rate increase.

The initial increase took place on Jan 1, 2023, when it rose from 7% to 8%.

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The PAP Administration giving various money BENEFITS is a SLY and CUNNING MANIPULATIVE scheme to create impression among people PAP is good at giving money back.

BUT PAP ‘GIVE us BACK’ SG’s RIGHTFULLY the PEOPLE’S OWN money.

So WHAT FRAUD the PAP continue and continue for AGES to DEFRAUD SG and its people?

Last edited 1 month ago by John Doe

Didnt many 1000s and 1000s of stupid Sheegaporeans Aware it’s MOSTLY the private companies, private businesses THAT COME OUT WITH MANY ASSISTANCE SCHEMES to help the poor PAY FOR DAILY NECESSITIES – and the PAP Administration PAY ONLY LIP SERVICE? Yes the PAP will SHOUT OUT LOUDLY they have many various schemes – BUT ALL these peanuts help ‘re MONEY STOLEN from SG taxes and RESERVES!

I was just told by my brother that his cigarettes cost him an extra 50 cents per pack. And this before implementation of the additional GST. (Of course, my advice is for him to quit smoking altogether. Imagine the savings and the health benefits of a ckear set of lungs) Giant used to offer 3% discount for weekday purchases for seniors. So this offer is only a sop and nothing to shout about. As I have questioned previously, if our S$ is so strong vis-a-vis especially the MR, where are the benefits derived from imports from Malaysia? The currency advantage… Read more »

just as wayang as NTUC, even if they don’t raise price, most their suppliers already raise more than 1 percent in the last few months, esp during oil and chicken crisis.

1) Why NTUC being the largest supermarket chain in SG cannot have such initiatives?
2) Why global inflation is affecting everyone, yet this year it seems (to me) that NTUC prices have gone up and maintained high more than the other (household) supermarket chains?
3) Why NTUC staff seems to have a “want-to-fight” attitude, compared with say Sheng Siong’s or Cold Storage, etc which are more friendly and customer-orientated?

People with the means will simply go across the border to shop anyway. The wealthy can afford to have cars and then proceed to buy petrol, necessities and everything else they can put in the boot from Malaysia.

Sounds like this GST hike is aimed at profiting off of those without the time or means to benefit from being neighbours with a country with a significantly lower cost of living (Outside of JB you can easily get a cup of tea or kopi for RM1-2).

Last edited 1 month ago by Blankslate

Not sure it will have much effect. I find myself buying increasingly from Sheng Siong. My shopping dollars have slowly but surely migrated from NTUC and Giant to them. I only buy from NTUC and maybe Giant if I happen to like their particular offering rather than the equivalent ones at Sheng Siong.

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