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Chinese national truck driver arrested in Singapore for evading S$180k in duties and taxes with contraband cigarettes

In a recent Singapore Customs operation at Geylang East Avenue 1, 1,356 cartons and 3,190 packets of duty-unpaid cigarettes were found in a truck.

The arrested 32-year-old Chinese national misused his food company delivery driver role to transport these illicit cigarettes.

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SINGAPORE: Singapore Customs recently conducted a targeted operation at a carpark in Geylang East Avenue 1 on 28 December 2023, in its efforts to combat illegal cigarette activities.

As per an official statement released on Thursday (4 Jan), Singapore Customs revealed that, in the course of the operation, its officers examined a truck and uncovered 1,356 cartons and 3,190 packets of duty-unpaid cigarettes concealed in the vehicle’s cargo compartment.

The individual behind the wheel, a 32-year-old Chinese national male, was apprehended, and both the duty-unpaid cigarettes and the truck were confiscated during the operation.

Further investigations uncovered that the suspect had purportedly been enlisted by an unidentified individual through a social messaging platform to facilitate the collection and delivery of duty-unpaid cigarettes.

The individual, employed as a delivery driver by a food company, had exploited his position to employ the company’s truck for the illicit transportation of the duty-unpaid cigarettes.

The total value of duty and Goods and Services Tax (GST) evaded amounted to S$179,292 (approximately US$135,079).

Legal proceedings are currently underway, Singapore Customs stated.

Underlining the gravity of the offences, the organization emphasized that engaging in the buying, selling, conveying, delivering, storing, keeping, possessing, or dealing with duty-unpaid goods constitutes a severe violation of the Customs Act and the GST Act.

Offenders face substantial penalties, including fines of up to 40 times the amount of duty and GST evaded, coupled with a potential prison sentence of up to six years.

Vehicles implicated in such offences are also at risk of forfeiture.

The Ministry of Finance oversees Singapore Customs, an agency devoted to safeguarding revenue and promoting fair and secure trade practices.

The agency actively ensures compliance with customs regulations and actively collects taxes and duties on dutiable and taxable goods.

They also regulate the export of strategic goods and uphold the nation’s obligations to international trade regulations, including those imposed by the United Nations Security Council Sanctions.

The agency collaborates closely with other government bodies, industry partners, and international organizations in the pursuit of its mission and operations.

Additionally, members of the public possessing information regarding smuggling activities or the evasion of duty or GST are encouraged to report any relevant details to Customs through their online portal.

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Is this Regime welcoming foreign talents to coerce them to be criminals – appears to be so. Who would in the right frame of mind wish to be a criminal to be locked up devoid of freedom and human dignity, for years?

Pappies: We need foreign talents.

Another alien commiting crimes in SG…so common news these days.
SIN CITY welcomes you!

Are these the foreign talents that our government so loved to import them and then converting them to PR and later citizens? 10 to 20 yrs ago even open legs at Geyland ot those mothers pei-du ma-ma also granted PR or citizenships.

SG is the melting pot of cesspools, money launderers, criminals, fugitives defacto place to come, widely welcomed as long as showing big money

This is what oversea talent imported by our govt do. You can forget about true blue locals being so enterprising.

Last edited 1 month ago by jajoo

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